Billing-xpress

We are together for the sake of real medication for you

Debate Changer?

For years, questions have swirled around the use of in vaccines, and their potential risks to human health. 

But every time concerns are raised, the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC) have defended their "aluminum adjuvants are safe" position by referring almost exclusively to a single study.

That study, published in 2011, by Dr. Robert J. Mitkus, a computational toxicologist in the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research at the FDA, concluded that aluminum adjuvants could safely be injected into children.

Was the Mitkus study reliable? Should it stand uncontested as the last word on aluminum in vaccine safety?

No, according to a new published in the Journal of Inorganic Biochemistry,  by World Mercury Project. According to the authors of “Critical Analysis of Reference Studies on the Toxicokinetics of Aluminum-Based Adjuvants:”

To date, aluminum adjuvants per se have, perhaps surprisingly, not been the subject of any official experimental investigation, and this being in spite of the well-established neurotoxicity of aluminum.

Billing-xpress’s position on vaccine safety is this: Some vaccines may be safe, some may not be safe, at least not for some people. As with any medicine, consumers have the right to know exactly what is in every vaccine, and what the latest, and best research says about the potential risk for each and every recommended vaccine, as well as the cumulative risks associated with aggressive vaccine schedules. We reject the false narrative, promoted by Big Pharma, that there are only two sides to the vaccine issue: pro-vaccine or "anti-vaxxer." Instead, as with any medication, we advocate that consumers seek guidance from reliable sources, and that medical practitioners and pharmaceutical manufacturers provide truthful, up-to-date information about the medicines they promote and profit from.

'

dapoxetine acquistare

kamagra oral jelly bestellen

кломид